natural remedies for dogs

All Natural Pet Products are Good For Your Dog’s Health

Top quality foods and natural remedies for dogs are valued for the same reasons many individuals prefer them over highly-processed foods and synthetic treatments. Lots of the same herbs, nutritional supplements and organic, all-natural foods designed for people are made for dogs also. In fact, as people find themselves more discriminating about what goes into their stomachs, they’re becoming equally as careful about what their pets consume.

Natural options include odor controls, flea and tick repellents and grooming solutions such as shampoos, dental sprays, eye drops and skin gels. Generally speaking, animals in the wild seem to have an instinct for what is alright to eat, but as your pet, they have no option other than relying on their owners to let them have the healthy foods, products and lifestyle they deserve.

A healthier lifestyle starts with quality food. Unfortunately, the labelling on a lot of commercial dog food is purposefully misleading. For instance, the word “natural”, when found in a product name, might be meaningless. While the American Association of Feed Control Officials describes a natural ingredient as a thing derived only from a plant, animal or mineral that is either unprocessed or physically manufactured without using any synthetic aid or chemical additive, it does not stop some businesses from misusing the phrase. Don’t trust the advertisements or titles that say “human-grade” or “USDA Inspected”, as both versions mean very little. Carefully investigate the ingredients, and use your common sense when selecting dog food. As a rule, avoid products with any of these ingredients:

* Artificial colors
* Artificial flavors
* Additives
* Added sugar or salt
* Meat by-products

Suspicious acronyms like BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) and BHT (butylated hydroxytolulene) along with lead, propylene glycol and sodium pentobarbital are toxic chemicals that should not be fed to your four legged companion.

Much like those produced for those of us on two legs, holistic, natural remedies for dogs often include herbs. Herbal tinctures are fantastic for treating chronic ailments, calming nerves, boosting immunity and advancing general well-being. As with all living creatures, one can find safe and unsafe herbs for dogs. Unless you are really familiar with the consequences of herbs both as an external treatment for cuts and wounds, and to be taken internally, it is prudent to not feed them to your dog. Some are toxic, or could be toxic if given in excess.

Herbal treatments almost always have a collective effect over a period of weeks or months so shouldn’t be used either for crisis situations or immediate results. They are best as complements to a healthy diet, active lifestyle and traditional medicine, if necessary.

Herbs can be used to treat depression, allergies, anxiousness and other afflictions. Beneficial herbs include calendula, coltsfoot, milk thistle, aloe, parsley and others. Garlic should only be used sparingly, while comfrey, wormwood, pennyroyal and undiluted tea tree oil, among others should never be given to dogs. Consult a animal medical practitioner or canine naturopath before using herbal remedies. Certain herbs should never be given to dogs with heart disorders, high blood pressure, anaemia or who are currently carrying a fetus. Never give herbs to a dog without being clear on their suitability.

Vitamins and supplements are an essential part of healthy living for dogs, especially as they age. They can make up for nutritional deficiencies, detoxify, build up immunity and help to strengthen weakened joints. Enzymes, fatty acids, glucosamine, kelp, apple cider vinegar and coconut oil are as therapeutic for dogs as for their owners. As with dog food, avoid supplements with sugar, corn syrup or any other unnecessary and potentially harmful component.

Other natural remedies for common canine problems include massage, acupuncture and aromatherapy. These usually have a positive effect for stiff, aging or nervous dogs. Natural dog foods and other items are available because pets deserve a nourishing life. Antibiotics, drugs or surgery are needed at times. However, a nourishing diet, preventative intake of vitamins and nutritional supplements and judicious use of herbal remedies and other natural healing methods can work wonders. For people who value the advantages of all-natural foods, body products and treatment for themselves, extending those benefits to their dogs is the responsible, loving thing to do.

Top quality foods and natural remedies for dogs are valued for the same reasons many individuals prefer them over highly-processed foods and synthetic treatments. Lots of the same herbs, nutritional supplements and organic, all-natural foods designed for people are made for dogs also. In fact, as people find themselves more discriminating about what goes into their stomachs, they’re becoming equally as careful about what their pets consume.

Natural options include odor controls, flea and tick repellents and grooming solutions such as shampoos, dental sprays, eye drops and skin gels. Generally speaking, animals in the wild seem to have an instinct for what is alright to eat, but as your pet, they have no option other than relying on their owners to let them have the healthy foods, products and lifestyle they deserve.

A healthier lifestyle starts with quality food. Unfortunately, the labelling on a lot of commercial dog food is purposefully misleading. For instance, the word “natural”, when found in a product name, might be meaningless. While the American Association of Feed Control Officials describes a natural ingredient as a thing derived only from a plant, animal or mineral that is either unprocessed or physically manufactured without using any synthetic aid or chemical additive, it does not stop some businesses from misusing the phrase. Don’t trust the advertisements or titles that say “human-grade” or “USDA Inspected”, as both versions mean very little. Carefully investigate the ingredients, and use your common sense when selecting dog food. As a rule, avoid products with any of these ingredients:

* Artificial colors
* Artificial flavors
* Additives
* Added sugar or salt
* Meat by-products

Suspicious acronyms like BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) and BHT (butylated hydroxytolulene) along with lead, propylene glycol and sodium pentobarbital are toxic chemicals that should not be fed to your four legged companion.

Much like those produced for those of us on two legs, holistic, natural remedies for dogs often include herbs. Herbal tinctures are fantastic for treating chronic ailments, calming nerves, boosting immunity and advancing general well-being. As with all living creatures, one can find safe and unsafe herbs for dogs. Unless you are really familiar with the consequences of herbs both as an external treatment for cuts and wounds, and to be taken internally, it is prudent to not feed them to your dog. Some are toxic, or could be toxic if given in excess.

Herbal treatments almost always have a collective effect over a period of weeks or months so shouldn’t be used either for crisis situations or immediate results. They are best as complements to a healthy diet, active lifestyle and traditional medicine, if necessary.

Herbs can be used to treat depression, allergies, anxiousness and other afflictions. Beneficial herbs include calendula, coltsfoot, milk thistle, aloe, parsley and others. Garlic should only be used sparingly, while comfrey, wormwood, pennyroyal and undiluted tea tree oil, among others should never be given to dogs. Consult a animal medical practitioner or canine naturopath before using herbal remedies. Certain herbs should never be given to dogs with heart disorders, high blood pressure, anaemia or who are currently carrying a fetus. Never give herbs to a dog without being clear on their suitability.

Vitamins and supplements are an essential part of healthy living for dogs, especially as they age. They can make up for nutritional deficiencies, detoxify, build up immunity and help to strengthen weakened joints. Enzymes, fatty acids, glucosamine, kelp, apple cider vinegar and coconut oil are as therapeutic for dogs as for their owners. As with dog food, avoid supplements with sugar, corn syrup or any other unnecessary and potentially harmful component.

Other natural remedies for common canine problems include massage, acupuncture and aromatherapy. These usually have a positive effect for stiff, aging or nervous dogs. Natural dog foods and other items are available because pets deserve a nourishing life. Antibiotics, drugs or surgery are needed at times. However, a nourishing diet, preventative intake of vitamins and nutritional supplements and judicious use of herbal remedies and other natural healing methods can work wonders. For people who value the advantages of all-natural foods, body products and treatment for themselves, extending those benefits to their dogs is the responsible, loving thing to do.

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Canine Diabetes – The Seven Symptoms You Must Know

Even though canine diabetes is becoming more and more common, many dog owners don’t know the symptoms of diabetes in dogs.  But ignorance is not bliss for your canine friend.If left untreated, diabetes in canines can cause blindness, infections, and death. 

Anyone who has a canine companions should know these seven symptoms seen in dogs with diabetes.

1. Drinking Lots Of Water

Never ignore this.  A dog who suddenly becomes very thirsty and is drinking lots of water may have high blood sugar levels.  In an attempt to flush some of the extra glucose out of her system, her body will be demanding more water.

Some dogs increase their water consumption so gradually that you may not be aware of it until she starts urinating a lot more often.

2. Urinating More Often Can Be A Sign of Canine Diabetes

If your pup is having accidents in the house because she can’t wait to get outside, or if she’s asking to go out more often, diabetes in canines may be the cause.

3. Her Get Up and Go Got Up and Went

A formerly peppy pup doesn’t want to do anything but lay around.  She seems weak and lethargic, not like her usual happy self.  She seems to have lost her interest in life.

4. Sudden Weight Gain Or Loss

If your dog has a sudden weight gain or loss, especially if she’s ravenously hungry, canine diabetes may be the reason. This is espcially true if she’s always hungry, but is losing weight.

5. Her Breath Smells Sweet

You notice that your dog’s breath smells sweet, not like the usual “dog breath.”.  This indicates that your dog has high blood glucose levels.  Take her to the vet right away.

6. Shivering or Shaking

A dog with the shakes may have hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar.  Your pet needs immediate veterinary treatment.

7. Infections That Never Seem To Go Away

A pet who has recurring urinary tract infections, gum infections, or fungal infections may have canine diabetes.  A decreased resistance to infections is one of the symptoms of diabetes in dogs. 

You May Not Notice Any Of These Symptoms of Canine Diabetes

Sometimes dogs with diabetes don’t show any of these symptoms because the disease changes their bodily functions so slowly.  This is why canine diabetes is known as the “silent killer.”

Can diabetes in canines be prevented?  Yes, it can.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Keep your dog slim and trim
  • Avoid feeding dry dog food.  Feed her a high quality canned food that’s high in fiber and low in fat..
  • Having her spayed will prevent the high estrogen levels that can sometimes interfere with insulin production.
  • Regular exercise will keep her in good condition, as well as helping to keep her blood sugar at normal levels.

Can natural remedies for dogs help?  Research has shown that certain herbs and dietary supplements may play a role in normalizing your pet’s blood glucose levels.    However, once canine diabetes has developed, your pet will need to be on insulin for the rest of her life.  Prevention is definitely the best cure.

Don’t continue to believe that ignorance about canine diabetes is bliss.  Protect your pet by knowing the symptoms of diabetes in dogs.  Click on any link above to learn more.

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